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Gunman Kills Nine, Then Himself at School

Media Reports Identify Shooter

BEMIDJI, Minn. (March 22) - A high school student went on a shooting rampage on an Indian reservation

Monday, killing his grandparents at their home and then seven people at his school, grinning and waving

as he fired, authorities and witnesses said. The suspect apparently killed himself after exchanging gunfire with police.

It was the nation's worst school shooting since the Columbine massacre in 1999 that killed 13 people.

One student said her classmates pleaded with the gunman to stop shooting.

''You could hear a girl saying, 'No, Jeff, quit, quit. Leave me alone. What are you doing?'' student Sondra

 Hegstrom told The Pioneer of Bemidji, using the name of the suspected shooter.

Before the shootings at Red Lake High School, the suspect's grandparents were shot in their home and

died later. There was no immediate indication of the gunman's motive.

Authorities didn't identify the gunman, but a few media outlets identified him as Jeff Weise, citing students

and tribal leaders. Accounts of Weise's age varied from 15 to 17, as did whether he was a current student

at the school.

Relatives told the St. Paul Pioneer Press that Weise was a loner who usually wore black and was teased by

 other kids. Relatives told the newspaper his father committed suicide four years ago, and that his mother was living in a Minneapolis nursing home because she suffered brain injuries in a car accident.

In addition to the shooter, the death toll at the school included five students, a teacher and a security guard,

FBI spokesman Paul McCabe said in Minneapolis. Among the dead was Neva Rogers, 62, a teacher at the school

for five or six years, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

Fourteen to 15 other students were injured, McCabe said. Some were being cared for in Bemidji, about 20 miles

 south of Red Lake. Authorities closed roads to the reservation in far northern Minnesota while they investigated

 the shootings.

Hegstrom described the shooter grinning and waving at a student his gun was pointed at, then swiveling to

shoot someone else. ''I looked him in the eye and ran in the room, and that's when I hid,'' she told The Pioneer.

McCabe declined to talk about a possible connection between the suspect and the couple killed at the home,

but Red Lake Fire Director Roman Stately said they were the grandparents of the gunman. He identified the

 shooter's grandfather as Daryl Lussier, a longtime officer with the Red Lake Police Department, and said Lussier's

 guns may have been used in the shootings.

Stately said the shooter had two handguns and a shotgun.

''After he shot a security guard, he walked down the hallway shooting and went into a classroom where he shot

a teacher and more students,'' Stately told Minneapolis television station KARE.

Students and a teacher, Diane Schwanz, said the gunman tried to break down a door to get into her classroom.

''I just got on the floor and called the cops,'' Schwanz told the Pioneer. ''I was still just half-believing it.''

Ashley Morrison, another student, had taken refuge in Schwanz's classroom. With the shooter banging on the

door, she dialed her mother on her cell phone. Her mother, Wendy Morrison, said she could hear gunshots on the line.

'''Mom, he's trying to get in here and I'm scared,''' Ashley Morrison told her mother, according to the newspaper.

All of the dead students were found in one room. One of them was a boy believed to be the shooter, McCabe

said. He said it was too early to speculate on a motive.

Martha Thunder's 15-year-old son, Cody, was being treated for a gunshot wound to the hip.

''He heard gunshots and the teacher said 'No, that's the janitor's doing something,' and the next thing he knew,

 the kid walked in there and pointed the gun right at him,'' Thunder said, standing outside the hospital in Bemidji.

Police officers were posted at the hospital Monday night to discourage reporters from entering. When a reporter

approached three men walking across a hospital parking lot, one broke down in tears, and the others said they

 had no comment.

The school was evacuated after the shootings and locked down for the investigation, McCabe said.

''It will probably take us throughout the night to really put the whole picture together,'' he said.

Floyd Jourdain Jr., chairman of the Red Lake Chippewa Tribe, called it ''without a doubt the darkest hour''

in the group's history. ''There has been a considerable amount of lives lost, and we still don't know the total of that,''

Jourdain said.

It was the nation's worst school shooting since two students at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.,

killed 12 students and a teacher and wounded 23 before killing themselves on April 20, 1999.

The rampage in Red Lake was the second fatal school shooting in Minnesota in 18 months. Two students

were killed at Rocori High School in Cold Spring in September 2003. Student John Jason McLaughlin, who

was 15 at the time, awaits trial in the case.

Red Lake High School, on the Red Lake Indian Reservation, has about 300 students, according to its Web site.

The reservation is about 240 miles north of the Twin Cities. It is home to the Red Lake Chippewa Tribe, one of the poorest in the state.

 According to the 2000 census, 5,162 people lived on the reservation, and all but 91 were Indians.

 

Preliminary reports are sketchy and they are all unconfirmed, but it is believed as many as 24 people have

 been shot on the Red Lake Indian Reservation, and at the Red Lake High School, and as many as 10 are

 reported to have died as a result of those shootings.  The majority of the shootings took place at the school.

At the time of this report, the school was still under lockdown and considered a hostile area yet, with local

 police, FBI investigators, state police, Leech Lake Police and county deputies at the scene, although students

 still in the building had all been released.

According to early reports, sometime after 2 p.m. a student of the school, allegedly shot his grandfather and

 grandmother at their home in the Back of Town (BOT) area in Red Lake, then went to the Red Lake High

School in his grandfather's law enforcement vehicle, where he shot and killed a school security guard, 8 students

 and 1 teacher..  There are reports of as many as 12 fatalities from the shootings, and 12 wounded--some critically.

The names of all the victims are being withheld pending notification of relatives.

The boy's grandfather was a veteran law enforcement officer for the Red Lake Police Department with over

 30 years experience, and the entire reservation is shocked, stunned and grieving.

Although still under investigation and further details will be released at a conference scheduled for 2 p.m.

 tomorrow, the student was reportedly involved in a confrontation with Red Lake Police inside the school

after the shotting, and may have fatally shot himself.

The weapons he reportedly used may have belonged to his grandfather, and a fire department official stated

 the boy was wearing a police utility belt with service revolvers and also had used a shotgun

A press conference was scheduled for
7 p.m. at the Criminal Justice Complex in Red Lake
.....

Prior to the conference in Red Lake however, Paul McCabe of the FBI issued a statement, confirming 8 had

died in the shooting, 2 were male students and 2 were female students--including the shooter, a juvenile male--a

female teacher, an adult male, and at the residence, a male and female.  He said at this time they believed the

shooter was acting alone and was among those who had died.  He said those stodents who had died were in one

classroom when they were shot.

McCabe wouldn't eleborate further, stating the investigation was ongoing with numerous law enforcement

agencies taking part in the investigation, including the FBI, Red Lake and Leech Lake police departments,

Beltrami Council Sheriffs Department and State police.

 

A press conference was held at the Criminal Justice Center in Red Lake at 7 p.m..

"First of all I'd like to thank everybody for their concern,"  Chairman Jourdain stated in the conference.

  "Today we've had an unfortunate and tragic series of events here on the Red Lake Reservation.  At this

 time we're going to defer any specific information over to the Department of Public Safety and also to the

Federal Bureau of Investigation.  This is, without a doubt, the darkest hour in the history of our tribe.  And I

 just want to again, send our heartfelt wishes out to the families, the victims, and everybody throughout America,

in light of the unfortunate events that happened here today."

Jourdain said our community was shocked and in dismay, when asked how the commuity was reacting. 

 He said in dealing with the tragic events, they would rely on people in the community who are leaders, teachers

and healers to come forth and advise everyone onhow to go about healing the community.  Right now, he said, they

were all in the initial stages of shock.  They would rely on the advise of elders and professional people to guide

 them through the crisis.

When asked about the security of the reservation, Jourdain stated
Red Lake
had it's own police department,

 and the school district also had their own security.

"I think the events today were something that could not be avoided,"  Jourdain said.

He said he had no specifics on the shooter, that he wasn't at liberty to comment specifically on the matter.

  He did say he believed a student came into the school and shot several individuals.

Jourdain said he anticipated there would be many support mechanisms that would converge on the reservation,

and they also had professionals on the Reservation who had experience in things of this nature--although not this

traumatic--when asked about support people for the community.  He said those resources would be made available

 to the community.

He was asked if there was any warning of the incident happening, which Jourdain said he didn't know, but didn't

see any indication that there was. 

"It just caught everybody completely by surprise and the whole town was floored by the events that happened

here today,"  Jourdain said.

He stated the building was currently secure, all students were out of the building, and the investigation on

currently ongoing.

The enrollment of
Red Lake High School was between 250-300, Chairman Jourdain stated, and further

 questioning was deferred to Public Safety Director, Pat Mills.

 

Mills stated they were still conducting their investigation and unable to give out a lot of information. 

"The only thing I can tell you right now is we have multiple victims in this instant, it did occurr at the

school, and there are a number of juveniles involved,"  Mills stated.  "Tomorrow, hopefull around 2-2:30 p.m.

 we'll have another press release and at that time we'll get into more details of what transpired.  There are some

 situations here  that we're still checking into that started this incident that occurred.  We did receive a 911 call

this afternoon at 2:55 p.m. this afternoon that there was a shooting at the [school].  Our officers did respond almost

 immediately and the officers did confront the alleged suspect at that time in the school building.  There was an

 exchange of gunfire and that's where we're at now--doing the investigation to determine what took place."

Mills further stated that they wanted to let the people know they did have the suspect--they knew who the

 suspect was, and there were no other individuals out there involved in the incident, so the community wouldn't

 have to worry about anything else.

"All the family members and victims were being taken care of,"  Mills said.  "They're meeting now at IHS

 (Indian Health Service), they're being provided counseling in any way they we help them, along with the

 sheriff's department who sent out some of their champlins to assist us in any way."

He wouldn't get into any details of the incident, and stated there has been security at the school since 1995. 

He said there were cameras situated in the school, they have reviewed the tapes, and would relate that

information at another conference.

The school was locked down after the initial call was received and to his understanding, teachers and

 staff knew what to do and did what had to be done according to school policies.  This occurred within

a matter of minutes.

Mills stated they have had emergency drills involving similar scenarios just last year, and he felt teachers

 and staff did what they were trained to do during the crisis.

Superintendent of Schools, Stuart Desjarlait, on behalf of the Red Lake Board of Education, offered

their condolences for the victims, and were in the process of getting their crisis management plan into place.

"We have one in place and that saved a lot of kids today, and teachers utilizing that plan and following it

 through on what was supposed to be done on in this case and in situations like this,"  Desjarlait said. 

 "We have a trememdous staff at Red Lake High School for knowing what to do.  We won't be having

 school for the rest of the week.  Tomorrow the district is closed, and the next day the staff will be coming

back in."

Desjarlait said they would be working with elders, spiritual leaders, mental health counselors, and getting

 a plan ready when high school teachers come back--and when the students come back to school next Wednesday.

He would not comment on the incident specifically due to the investigation still ongoing, and he said

 the district had about 1500 kids in four buildings.  Red Lake's School District consisted of the high

 school, a middle school and elementary school located in Red Lake, and another K-8 grade school

in the Ponemah District about 25 miles north of Red Lake.

Mills explained why the FBI was investigating the incident.  He said the federal government is

 responsible for all major crimes that occur on Indian Reservations.  Red Lake falls under that

 jurisdiction of the FBI.  Major crimes include homicides, rape, assaults, kidnapping and ect. 

 The Red Lake Police Department handles a lot of the misdemeanor cases and assists the FBI on their felony cases.

All Red Lake Schools will be closed until Tuesday of next week, and a press conference is

 scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, when more details will be released, along with the names of victims.

 

Teen Gunman Kills Nine, Then Himself in Minnesota

Grandparents Slain Before Rampage at High School, Say Authorities

 

REDBY, Minn. (March 22) - The suspect in the worst U.S. school shooting since Columbine smiled and

 waved as he gunned down five students, a teacher and a guard, asking one of his victims whether he

 believed in God, witnesses said. The teen's grandfather and his grandfather's wife also were found dead,

 and the boy killed himself.

Reggie Graves, a student at Red Lake High School, said he was watching a movie about Shakespeare in

class Monday when he heard the gunman blast his way past the metal detector at the school's entrance,

killing a guard.

Then, in a nearby classroom, he heard the gunman say something to his friend Ryan: ''He asked Ryan if he

believed in God,'' Graves said. ''And then he shot him.''

The death toll at the Red Lake Indian Reservation in far northern Minnesota made it the nation's worst

 school shooting since the rampage at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in April 1999 that

ended with the deaths of 12 students, a teacher and the two teen gunmen.

The victims included the gunman's grandfather; the grandfather's wife; a school security guard; a

teacher; and five other students. At least 14 others were wounded, and two students remained in

 critical condition Tuesday at MeritCare in Fargo, N.D., officials said.

''There's not a soul that will go untouched by the tragic loss that we've experienced here,''

Floyd Jourdain Jr., chairman of the Red Lake Chippewa Tribe, told WCCO-TV of Minneapolis on Tuesday.

Police said the gunman killed himself after exchanging fire with officers. Red Lake Fire Director Roman

Stately said the gunman had two handguns and a shotgun.

''We ask Minnesotans to help comfort the families and friends of the victims who are suffering unimaginable

 pain by extending prayers and expressions of support,'' Gov. Tim Pawlenty said.

The shooter was Jeff Weise, a 17-year-old student who had been placed in the school's Homebound

program for some violation of policy, said school board member Kathryn Beaulieu. Students in that program

 stay at home and are tutored by a traveling teacher. Beaulieu said she didn't know what Weise's

 violation was, and wouldn't be allowed to reveal it if she did.

There was no immediate indication of Weise's motive. But several students said he held anti-social beliefs,

 and he may have posted messages on a neo-Nazi Web site expressing admiration for Adolf Hitler.

A writer who identified himself as Jeff Weise of the Red Lake Reservation posted the messages under

the nickname ''Todesengel'' - German for ''angel of death.'' An April 2004 posting by him referred to being

accused of ''a threat on the school I attend,'' though the writer later said he was cleared.

Relatives told the St. Paul Pioneer Press that Weise was a loner who usually wore black and was

teased by other kids. Relatives told the newspaper his father committed suicide four years ago,

and that his mother was living in a Minneapolis nursing home because she suffered brain injuries in a car accident.

Beaulieu said school was canceled Tuesday, but plans hadn't been made for the rest of the week.

During the rampage, teachers herded students from one room to another, trying to move away

from the sound of the shooting, said Graves, 14. He said some students crouched under desks.

Some pleaded with the gunman to stop. ''You could hear a girl saying, 'No, Jeff, quit, quit. Leave me

 alone. What are you doing?''' Sondra Hegstrom told The Pioneer of Bemidji.

Student Ashley Morrison said she heard shots, then saw the gunman's face peering though a door window

 of a classroom where she was hiding with several other students. After banging at the door, the shooter

 walked away and she heard more shots, she said.

''I can't even count how many gunshots you heard, there was over 20. ... There were people screaming,

and they made us get behind the desk,'' she said.

FBI spokesman Paul McCabe said the gunman exchanged gunfire with Red Lake police in a hallway,

then retreated to a classroom, where he was believed to have shot himself.

 

All of the dead students were found in one room, including the teen believed to be the shooter.

Authorities closed roads to the reservation in far northern Minnesota while they investigated the

 shootings. The reservation, about 240 miles north of the Twin Cities, is home to the Red Lake Chippewa

Tribe, one of the poorest in the state. According to the 2000 census, 5,162 people lived on the

 reservation, and all but 91 were Indians.

Some of the injured were being cared for in Bemidji, about 20 miles south of Red Lake. Police officers

were posted at the hospital Monday night to keep reporters from entering. When a reporter approached

 three men walking across a hospital parking lot, one broke down in tears and the others said they had no comment.

It was the second fatal school shooting in Minnesota in 18 months. Two students were killed at Rocori High

 School in Cold Spring in September 2003. Student John Jason McLaughlin, who was 15 at the time, awaits trial in the case.

Red Lake High School has about 300 students, according to its Web site.

 

 Shooter Seemed Fascinated With Death

Students Say There May Have Been Warning Signs

BEMIDJI, Minn. (March 22) - He created comic books with ghastly drawings of people shooting each other

 and wrote stories about zombies. He dressed in black, wore eyeliner and apparently admired Hitler and

called himself the ''Angel of Death'' in German. His father committed suicide about four years ago, and his

mother is in a nursing home after an auto accident, according to news reports.

On Monday, 17-year-old Jeff Weise went on a rampage, shooting to death his grandfather and the

grandfather's companion, then invading his school on the Red Lake Indian Reservation. Armed with two

pistols and a shotgun, he killed nine people and wounded seven before shooting himself to death in

the nation's bloodiest school shooting since Columbine High in Colorado six years ago.

Investigators are not sure exactly what set Weise off, but fellow students at Red Lake High said they

saw what looked, in retrospect, like warning signs.

About a month ago, his sketch of a guitar-strumming skeleton accompanied by a caption that read

 ''March to the death song 'til your boots fill with blood'' was displayed in his English class, said classmate

Parston Graves Jr.

Graves, 16, said he was thinking about that picture Tuesday. ''I thought that was him letting everyone

know'' that he was going to do something, Graves said.

Graves said Weise had also shown him comic books he had drawn, filled with well-crafted images of people

shooting each other. ''It was mental stuff,'' he said. ''It was sick.''

Weise, who routinely wore a long black trench coat, eyeliner and combat boots, has been described

by several classmates as a quiet teenager. Some of them knew about his troubled childhood - relatives

 told the St. Paul Pioneer Press his father had committed suicide and his mother suffered head injuries in an auto accident.

Audrey Thayer, a friend of the family who also works for the Minnesota chapter of the American Civil

Liberties Union office in Bemidji, about 30 miles from the town where the shooting occurred, said Weise's

story was one of ''devastation and loss.''

Thayer said Weise had been living with his 58-year-old grandfather, Daryl Lussier, and Lussier's 32-year-old

 companion, Michelle Sigana. Thayer said Weise had been teased at school, but she didn't think that set

 him off. ''In high school, you always have jabs at each other,'' she said.

Authorities said that during the rampage inside the school, Weise appeared to choose his victims at random.

 Some witnesses said he smiled and waved as he fired.

Michael Tabman, the FBI's agent in charge of the Minneapolis office, said Tuesday authorities had not

 established a motive for the shootings. Investigators said they did not know if there had been some

kind of confrontation between Weise and his grandfather.

If Weise was quiet in school, he became an extrovert in cyberspace. It appeared he may have posted

messages on a neo-Nazi Web site expressing admiration for Hitler and calling himself ''Todesengel,''

German for the ''Angel of Death.''

Several notes signed by a Jeff Weise, who identified himself as ''a Native American from the Red Lake

'Indian' Reservation,'' were posted beginning last year on a Web site operated by the Libertarian

National Socialist Green Party.

In one posting, he criticized interracial mixing on the reservation and slammed fellow Indian teens for

 listening to rap music. ''We have kids my age killing each other over things as simple as a fight,

and it's because of the rap influence,'' he wrote.

While the writing of his postings on the neo-Nazi Web site may have been sloppy and full of typos,

 Weise was also able to write more polished prose for stories published on the Internet about zombies.

Weise's Hotmail address links him to frequent postings on one Internet forum called ''Rise of the

Dead,'' a site where contributors collaborate on stories about ''average people attempting to

 survive in a zombie-infested world,'' according to the site.

Weise, posting under the handle ''Blades11,'' appeared to be a regular contributor to numerous

 fan fiction sites related to zombies. On one, Weise identifies himself as being from Red Lake and

lists himself as an amateur writer.

He goes on to write, ''I'm a fan of zombie films, have been for years, as well as fan of horror

movies in general. I like to write horror stories, read about Nazi Germany and history, and someday

plan on moving out of the US.''

In a posting from Feb. 6, he agreed to continue contributing to a story line but added that things are

''kind of rocky right now so I might disappear unexpectedly.''

Fellow student Ashley Morrison, 17, said Weise liked heavy metal music and dressed like a ''goth,'' with

black clothes, chains on his pants and black spiky hair.

''He looks like one of those guys at the Littleton school,'' Morrison said, referring to the two teen gunman,

 members of the so-called Trench Coat Mafia, who killed 12 students, a teacher and themselves at

 Columbine near Littleton, Colo., in 1999.

Link to this web site  http://www.nazi.org

School Shooter Appeared to Act Alone

Teen Described as a Loner Who Had Disciplinary Problems

RED LAKE, Minn. (March 22) - The boy accused of killing nine people in a shooting spree first

shot his grandfather and his companion, then donned the man's police-issue gunbelt and bulletproof

 vest before heading to the high school, where he shot students and teachers at random, authorities

said Tuesday.

FBI agent Michael Tabman said Jeff Weise appeared to be acting alone in Monday's rampage and the

 motive was unknown. When it was over, 10 people, including five students and Weise himself, were dead.

It was the worst U.S. school shooting since Columbine.

At a news conference Tuesday, Tabman said he couldn't confirm whether Weise was the same person

who made posts to a neo-Nazi site, including one in which the writer billed himself as the ''Angel of Death.''

Aside from the teen's grandfather, Daryl Lusier, and Lusier's companion, Michelle Sigana, Weise's targets

appeared random, Weise said. An unarmed security guard and a teacher also were killed.

Initial reports had as many as 15 people injured in the shooting, but authorities Tuesday lowered that to

seven. Five remained in the hospital, including two students with critical injuries from gunshot wounds to

the head or face.

Some of the victims were shot at close range, medical officials said.

Reggie Graves, a student at Red Lake High School, said he was watching a movie about Shakespeare

 in class Monday when he heard the gunman blast his way past the metal detector at the school's

 entrance, where an unarmed guard was killed.

Then, in a nearby classroom, he heard the gunman say something to his friend Ryan. ''He asked Ryan

 if he believed in God,'' Graves said. ''And then he shot him.'' The boy survived.

The death toll at the Red Lake Indian Reservation in far northern Minnesota made it the nation's worst

 school shooting since the rampage at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in April 1999 that

 ended with the deaths of 12 students, a teacher and the two teen gunmen.

''Right now we are in utter disbelief and shock,'' said Floyd Jourdain Jr., chairman of the Red Lake

 Band of Chippewa.

At least three of the victims were shot in the head at close range, said officials at North Country

 Regional Hospital in nearby Bemidji. One of those victims died and the other two were transferred

to the Fargo hospital.

''I think there was an intent to kill,'' Tim Hall, the hospital's emergency nursing director, said at a

morning news conference. Three victims remained at North Country Regional, none in critical condition.

Police said the gunman killed himself after exchanging fire with officers. Red Lake Fire Director Roman

Stately said the gunman had two handguns and a shotgun.

''We ask Minnesotans to help comfort the families and friends of the victims who are suffering unimaginable

pain by extending prayers and expressions of support,'' Gov. Tim Pawlenty said.

Weise, whom authorities described variously as 16 or 17, who had been placed in the school's

Homebound program for some violation of policy, said school board member Kathryn Beaulieu.

Students in that program stay at home and are tutored by a traveling teacher. Beaulieu said she

didn't know what Weise's violation was, and wouldn't be allowed to reveal it if she did.

There was no immediate indication of Weise's motive. But several students said he held anti-social

 beliefs, and he may have posted messages on a neo-Nazi Web site expressing admiration for Adolf Hitler.

A writer who identified himself as Jeff Weise of the Red Lake Reservation posted the messages under

the nickname ''Todesengel'' - German for ''angel of death.'' An April 2004 posting by him referred to

 being accused of ''a threat on the school I attend,'' though the writer later said he was cleared.

Tabman said it hadn't been determined if the writer was actually Weise.

Relatives told the St. Paul Pioneer Press that Weise was a loner who usually wore black and was

teased by others. Relatives told the newspaper his father committed suicide four years ago, and

that his mother was living in a Minneapolis nursing home because she suffered brain injuries in a car accident.

During the rampage, teachers herded students from one room to another, trying to move away from

the sound of the shooting, said Graves, 14. He said some students crouched under desks.

Some pleaded with the gunman to stop. ''You could hear a girl saying, 'No, Jeff, quit, quit. Leave me

 alone. What are you doing?''' Sondra Hegstrom told The Pioneer of Bemidji.

The reservation, about 240 miles north of the Twin Cities, is home to the Red Lake Chippewa Tribe,

one of the poorest in the state. According to the 2000 census, 5,162 people lived on the reservation.

It was the second fatal school shooting in Minnesota in 18 months. Two students were killed at Rocori

 High School in Cold Spring in September 2003. Student John Jason McLaughlin, who was 15 at the time,

awaits trial in the case.

Tips to Schools, Parents & America's Kids:
            Preventing Tragedies ... in the Past and in the Future
 
    FOR SCHOOLS:  To help school systems see the early warning signs of danger
and deal with the psychological fallout of the shooting, KidsPeace has online
articles ( http://www.kidspeace.org ) from its national "Healing" magazine on
"Why Kids Shoot Kids." And how to help kids cope with grief. They can also
encourage students to use http://www.TeenCentral.net .
    FOR PARENTS:  For Minnesota children who have fears that their school is
not safe or may become the next target of a Columbine-type shooting, KidsPeace
offers 10 ways for parents and teachers to reassure and help their kids
through this crisis (SEE TIPS AT END OF RELEASE).
    FOR KIDS:  Perhaps most importantly, KidsPeace and top children's experts
from Harvard and Brown University have created a unique free website,
http://www.TeenCentral.net that allows older kids and teens to work through
the emotional stresses of growing up today -- before those stresses become
dangerous or overwhelming.  TeenCentral.net, which gets 16 million hits a
year, gives clinically screened help and hope to kids in all 50 states, at
U.S. military bases worldwide, and in dozens of countries around the globe.
The site helps kids identify the problems they face, from depression to school
pressures, peer problems, family disputes, drugs, alcohol, smoking, even
suicidal thoughts or thoughts of harming others.
 
              School Shootings and Killings Averted in the Past
 
    TeenCentral.net has prevented a number of mass tragedies, as well as an
uncountable number of personal ones. This happened in 2002 when a California
teenager wrote in to TeenCentral.net saying he was going to "go Columbine" and
kill students at his school. Although the site rigorously protects kids'
identity, a vigilant online counselor at KidsPeace alerted the authorities
about the anonymous threat.  In cases of potential disaster, the authorities
can obtain a court order to track an individual server and the tragedy was
prevented.  Although this kind of occurrence is unusual, this was one of
several instances in several states where distraught teens were prevented by
TeenCentral.net from carrying out plans to kill groups of their peers.
    "The point is," says C.T. O'Donnell II, president and CEO of KidsPeace,
the National Center for Kids Overcoming Crisis, "there are resources that can
save lives -- of desperate kids who may hurt themselves or others when they
think there is nowhere to turn for help. KidsPeace's TeenCentral.net lets
America's kids know they are not alone and they can get help before their
problems get too big for them to handle."
    "In many cases we get what amount to cries for help from children who are
bullied, abused, alone and hurt," says Herbert Mandell, M.D., medical director
for KidsPeace and the KidsPeace Children's Hospital.  "We help those children
with expert advice, comfort, and resources. However, once in a while we see
that circumstances are spinning out of control and we are able to prevent an
even bigger tragedy.  The key is to get to more kids under pressure and stop a
bad situation from becoming a disaster for them ... and for the rest of us."
 
                       (TIPS FOR PARENTS FOLLOW BELOW)
 
             10 Tips for Talking to Children About the Shootings
 
    The effects of trauma in children may linger and manifest themselves
physically and behaviorally.  C.T. O'Donnell II, president and CEO of
KidsPeace, and the clinical experts at KidsPeace have compiled a list of tips
to help parents talk to their children about what happened and look out for
future signs of distress:
 
    1.  Listen to children. Allow them to express their concerns and fears.
 
    2.  Regardless of age, the most important issue is to reassure children of
        safety and security. Tell children that you, their school, their
        friends and their communities are all focused on their safety and that
        those around them are working for their safety. Have discussions about
        those dedicated to protecting them like police, teachers and other
        school officials, neighbors and all concerned adults throughout the
        community.
 
    3.  When discussing the events with younger children, the amount of
        information shared should be limited to some basic facts. Use words
        meaningful to them (not words like sniper, etc.). Share with them that
        some bad people have used violence to hurt innocent people in the
        area. Discuss that we don't know exactly by whom or why this was done,
        but violence has occurred. Do not go into specific details.
 
    4.  School-aged children will ask, "Can this happen here, or to me?" Do
        not lie to children. Share that it is unlikely that anything like this
        will happen to them or in their community. Then reiterate how the
        community is focused on working to keep everyone safe in the
        community.
 
    5.  Parents, caregivers and teachers should be cautious of permitting
        young children to watch news or listen to radio that is discussing or
        showing carnage. It is too difficult for most of them to process.
        Personal discussions are the best way to share information with this
        group. Also, plan to discuss this many times over the coming weeks.
 
    6.  When discussing the events with preteens and teens, more detail is
        appropriate, and many will already have seen news broadcasts. Do not
        let them focus too much on graphic details. Rather, elicit their
        feelings and concerns and focus your discussions on what they share
        with you. Be careful of how much media they are exposed to. Talk
        directly with them about the tragedy and answer their questions
        truthfully.
 
    7.  Although this group is more mature, do not forget to reassure them of
        their safety and your efforts to protect them. Regardless of age, kids
        must hear this message.
 
    8.  Be on the lookout for physical symptoms of anxiety that children may
        demonstrate. They may be a sign that a child, although not directly
        discussing the tragedy, is very troubled by the recent events. Talk
        more directly to children who exhibit these signs:
 
          Headaches                    Excessive worry
          Stomach aches                Increased arguing
          Back aches                   Irritability
          Trouble sleeping or eating   Loss of concentration
          Nightmares                   Withdrawal
          Refusal to go to school      Clinging behavior
 
    9.  Parents and caregivers should often reassure children that they will
        be protected and kept safe. During tragedies like these, words
        expressing safety and reassurance with concrete plans should be
        discussed and agreed upon within the family.
 
    10. If you are concerned about your children and their reaction to this or
        any tragedy, talk directly with their school counselor, family doctor,
        local mental health professional or have your older children visit
        KidsPeace's teen-help web site, http://www.teencentral.net which
        provides anonymous and clinically-screened help and resources for teen
        problems before they become overwhelming.
 
    KidsPeace is a 123-year-old national children's crisis charity dedicated
to giving hope, help, and healing to children facing crisis. With more than 50
centers nationwide, KidsPeace directly thousands of children a day with
life-saving treatment to overcome the crises of growing up. With the help of
VIP leaders including its national spokesperson Leeza Gibbons, KidsPeace helps
millions more each year through educational outreach and awareness programs
designed to help America's kids and parents anticipate, intervene in and
master crises that can affect any child -- from disasters and personal traumas
to family issues and neglect to life-threatening depression, eating disorders,
and the many stresses of modern life.  KidsPeace was named "The Outstanding
Organization" of its kind in the country by the American Association of
Psychiatric Services for Children and was called "a prototype of what we need
for all children everywhere" by the late, nationally renowned child and family
expert, Dr. Lee Salk.
 
     Contact:  Mark Stubis or Anna Radev
               800-25-PEACE
 
     EXPERTS AVAILABLE

 

Attention Red Lake Nation members.

I am sorry to announce that the events that took place today involving the
shootings at the
Red Lake High School
make this one of the darkest and most
painful occurrences in the history of our tribe.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of the victims.

I can assure the
Red Lake
tribal members that the situation is under control and secure.
Several organizations and agencies have offered assistance in our time of need and the
Red Lake
Nation has graciously accepted.

The FBI, ATF, BCA, along with the Beltrami County Sheriff’s Department, the Minnesota State Highway Patrol and the Red Cross will be providing assistance to our public safety department through out the next several days. These agencies are all here with our permission.

An information line has been set up to handle your calls and to answer any questions you may have. The number is 679-4284.This is a 24 hour emergency line.

Because of the tragic nature of this unfortunate occurrence, I am calling on all tribal entities and programs to stand alert in order to provide assistance to those in need.

I am ordering all
Red Lake and United States
flags to be flown at half staff until further notice.

Finally, I encourage all
Red Lake
Nation members to embrace and support one another in these tragic times.

Miigwetch

Floyd Jourdain Jr.,
Chairman
Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians

24 people shot in Red Lake, the majority at Red Lake High School - 10 fatalitie

 

 

RED LAKE WEB SITE’S LINKS AND OTHER HELP FO WEB SITE'S

TOO LINK'S HERE

 

Red Lake Tribal Council

Red Lake Net News

Red Lake Nation Forum
Red Lake Nation Telephone Directory
Jourdain/Perpich Extended Care Facility

Brief History of Red Lake
Pow-wow Pages


Seven Clans Casino

National Congress of American Indians
Red Lake Builders Inc.
Red Lake Foods Inc.


Employment & Training JTPA
Tribal Council Telephone Extensions

 

SOURCE KidsPeace
Web Site:
http://www.kidspeace.org
   http://www.teencentral.net
 
http://www.paulbunyan.net/rlschools/hs.htm
 
http://www.redlakenation.org
 
THERE IS A VERY GOOD  INDIAN WEB WING WE AT BIG 8 AT IT’S BEST NEWS HAS LINKS TO OTHER WEB RINGS ON OR HOME PAGE AT  HTTP://WWW.BIG8ATITSBESTNEWS.COM   INDIAN WEB WEB SITE IS      http://www.indiancircle.com/