BIG 8 AT IT'S BEST NEWS

WE ARE HERE FOR YOU

          AUGUST.7.2005 1938 - 2005 PETTER JENNINGS PASS AWAY NEWS DATE IS ON AUGUST.8.2005  

              BIG 8 AT IT'S BEST NEWS -- WE ARE HERE FOR YOU RUN BY DAVID AARON GARCIA


Peter Jennings PASS AWAY AT AGE 67

 

 

 

ABC News Anchor Peter Jennings died Sunday at his home in New York City.

He was 67. On April 5, Jennings announced he had been diagnosed with lung cancer.

He is survived by his wife, Kayce Freed, his two children, Elizabeth, 25, and Christopher, 23,

 and his sister, Sarah Jennings.

"Peter died with his family around him, without pain and in peace. He knew he'd lived a good life,

" his wife and children said in a statement.

In announcing Jennings' death to his ABC colleagues, News President David Westin wrote:

"For four decades, Peter has been our colleague, our friend, and our leader in so many ways.

None of us will be the same without him.

"As you all know, Peter learned only this spring that the health problem he'd been struggling with

was lung cancer. With Kayce, he moved straight into an aggressive chemotherapy treatment. He

 knew that it was an uphill struggle. But he faced it with realism, courage, and a firm hope that he

would be one of the fortunate ones. In the end, he was not.

"We will have many opportunities in the coming hours and days to remember Peter for all that he

meant to us all. It cannot be overstated or captured in words alone. But for the moment, the finest

tribute we can give is to continue to do the work he loved so much and inspired us to do."

Reported World-Shaping Events

As one of America's most distinguished journalists, Jennings reported many of the pivotal events

that have shaped our world. He was in Berlin in the 1960s when the Berlin Wall was going up, and

there in the '90s when it came down. He covered the civil rights movement in the southern United

States during the 1960s, and the struggle for equality in South Africa during the 1970s and '80s. He was

there when the Voting Rights Act was signed in 1965, and on the other side of the world when South

Africans voted for the first time. He has worked in every European nation that once was behind the Iron

Curtain. He was there when the independent political movement Solidarity was born in a Polish shipyard,

 and again when Poland's communist leaders were forced from power. And he was in Hungary,

Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Romania and throughout the Soviet Union to record first the

 repression of communism and then its demise. He was one of the first reporters to go to Vietnam

in the 1960s, and went back to the killing fields of Cambodia in the 1980s to remind Americans

that, unless they did something, the terror would return.

On Dec. 31, 1999, Jennings anchored ABC's Peabody-award winning coverage of Millennium Eve,

"ABC 2000." Some 175 million Americans watched the telecast, making it the biggest live global

television event ever. "The day belonged to ABC News," wrote The Washington Post, "... with

Peter Jennings doing a nearly superhuman job of anchoring." Jennings was the only anchor to

appear live for 25 consecutive hours.

Jennings also led ABC's coverage of the Sept. 11 attacks and America's subsequent war on

terrorism. He anchored more than 60 hours that week during the network's longest continuous

period of news coverage, and was widely praised for providing a reassuring voice during the time

 of crisis. TV Guide called him "the center of gravity," while the Washington Post wrote, "Jennings,

in his shirt sleeves, did a Herculean job of coverage." The coverage earned ABC News Peabody

and duPont awards.

Overseas, and at Home

Jennings joined ABC News on Aug. 3, 1964. He served as the anchor of "Peter Jennings with the

News" from 1965 to 1967.

He established the first American television news bureau in the Arab world in 1968 when he

 served as ABC News' bureau chief for Beirut, Lebanon, a position he held for seven years. He

 helped put ABC News on the map in 1972 with his coverage of the Summer Olympics in Munich,

 when Arab terrorists took Israeli athletes hostage.

In 1975, Jennings moved to Washington to become the news anchor of ABC's morning program

 "A.M. America". After a short stint in the mornings, Jennings returned overseas to Rome where

 he stayed before moving to London to become ABC's Chief Foreign Correspondent. In 1978 he

 was named the foreign desk anchor for "World News Tonight." He co-anchored the program

with Frank Reynolds in Washington, D.C., and Max Robinson in Chicago until 1983.

Jennings was named anchor and senior editor of "World News Tonight" in 1983. In his more

 than 20 years in the position he was honored with almost every major award given to television

 journalists.

His extensive domestic and overseas reporting experience was evident in "World News Tonight's"

coverage of major crises. He reported from all 50 states and locations around the globe. During the

1991 Gulf War and the 2003 War in Iraq, his knowledge of Middle Eastern affairs brought invaluable

perspective to ABC News' coverage of the war in Iraq and the drug trade in Central and South

 America. The series also tackled important domestic issues such as gun control policy, the politics

of abortion, the crisis in funding for the arts and a highly praised chronicle of the accused bombers

of Oklahoma City. "Peter Jennings Reporting" earned numerous awards, including the 2004 Edward

 R. Morrow award for best documentary for "The Kennedy Assassination -- Beyond Conspiracy."

Jennings also had a particular interest in broadcasting for the next generation. He did numerous

 live news specials for children on subjects ranging from growing up in the age of AIDS, to prejudice

and its effects on our society. After the events of September 11, and again on the first anniversary, he

anchored a town hall meeting for children and parents entitled, "Answering Children's Questions."

Jennings was honored with many awards for news reporting, including 16 Emmys, two George Foster

Peabody Awards, several Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards and several Overseas Press Club

 Awards. Most recently, "World News Tonight" was recognized with two consecutive Edward R. Murrow

awards for best newscast, based on field reporting done by Jennings on the California wildfires and the

transfer of power in Iraq.

Jennings was the author, with Todd Brewster, of the acclaimed New York Times best seller, "The

Century." It featured first-person accounts of the great events of the century. In 1999, he anchored

the 12-hour ABC series, "The Century," and ABC's series for The History Channel, "America's Time.

" He and Brewster also published "In Search of America," a companion book for the six-part ABC

News series

Aug. 7 — ABC News Anchor Peter Jennings died today at his home in New York City. He was

 67. On April 5, Jennings announced he had been diagnosed with lung cancer.

He is survived by his wife, Kayce Freed, his two children, Elizabeth, 25, and Christopher, 23,

 and his sister, Sarah Jennings.

"Peter died with his family around him, without pain and in peace. He knew he'd lived a good

life," his wife and children said in a statement.

In announcing Jennings' death to his ABC colleagues, News President David Westin wrote:

"For four decades, Peter has been our colleague, our friend, and our leader in so many ways.

None of us will be the same without him.

"As you all know, Peter learned only this spring that the health problem he'd been struggling

 with was lung cancer. With Kayce, he moved straight into an aggressive chemotherapy

treatment. He knew that it was an uphill struggle. But he faced it with realism, courage, and

a firm hope that he would be one of the fortunate ones. In the end, he was not.

"We will have many opportunities in the coming hours and days to remember Peter for all

 that he meant to us all. It cannot be overstated or captured in words alone. But for the

moment, the finest tribute we can give is to continue to do the work he loved so much

 and inspired us to do."

Reported World-Shaping Events

As one of America's most distinguished journalists, Jennings reported many of the pivotal

 events that have shaped our world. He was in Berlin in the 1960s when the Berlin Wall

was going up, and there in the '90s when it came down. He covered the civil rights movement

in the southern United States during the 1960s, and the struggle for equality in South Africa

during the 1970s and '80s. He was there when the Voting Rights Act was signed in 1965, and

 on the other side of the world when South Africans voted for the first time. He has worked in

every European nation that once was behind the Iron Curtain. He was there when the independent

political movement Solidarity was born in a Polish shipyard, and again when Poland's communist

leaders were forced from power. And he was in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Romania

 and throughout the Soviet Union to record first the repression of communism and then its demise.

He was one of the first reporters to go to Vietnam in the 1960s, and went back to the killing fields

of Cambodia in the 1980s to remind Americans that, unless they did something, the terror would return.

On Dec. 31, 1999, Jennings anchored ABC's Peabody-award winning coverage of Millennium

 Eve, "ABC 2000." Some 175 million Americans watched the telecast, making it the biggest live

global television event ever. "The day belonged to ABC News," wrote The Washington Post, "…

 with Peter Jennings doing a nearly superhuman job of anchoring." Jennings was the only anchor

to appear live for 25 consecutive hours.

Jennings also led ABC's coverage of the Sept. 11 attacks and America's subsequent war on

terrorism. He anchored more than 60 hours that week during the network's longest continuous

 period of news coverage, and was widely praised for providing a reassuring voice during the time

 of crisis. TV Guide called him "the center of gravity," while the Washington Post wrote, "Jennings,

 in his shirt sleeves, did a Herculean job of coverage." The coverage earned ABC News Peabody

and duPont awards.

Overseas, and at Home

Jennings joined ABC News on Aug. 3, 1964. He served as the anchor of "Peter Jennings with the

 News" from 1965 to 1967.

He established the first American television news bureau in the Arab world in 1968 when he served

as ABC News' bureau chief for Beirut, Lebanon, a position he held for seven years. He helped put

ABC News on the map in 1972 with his coverage of the Summer Olympics in Munich, when Arab

 terrorists took Israeli athletes hostage.

In 1975, Jennings moved to Washington to become the news anchor of ABC's morning program

 "A.M. America". After a short stint in the mornings, Jennings returned overseas to Rome where

 he stayed before moving to London to become ABC's Chief Foreign Correspondent. In 1978 he

was named the foreign desk anchor for "World News Tonight." He co-anchored the program with

 Frank Reynolds in Washington, D.C., and Max Robinson in Chicago until 1983.

Jennings was named anchor and senior editor of "World News Tonight" in 1983. In his more than

20 years in the position he was honored with almost every major award given to television journalists.

His extensive domestic and overseas reporting experience was evident in "World News Tonight's"

 coverage of major crises. He reported from all 50 states and locations around the globe. During the

 1991 Gulf War and the 2003 War in Iraq, his knowledge of Middle Eastern affairs brought invaluable

 perspective to ABC News' coverage of the war in Iraq and the drug trade in Central and South

America. The series also tackled important domestic issues such as gun control policy, the politics

of abortion, the crisis in funding for the arts and a highly praised chronicle of the accused

 bombers of Oklahoma City. "Peter Jennings Reporting" earned numerous awards,

including the 2004 Edward R. Morrow award for best documentary for "The Kennedy

Assassination — Beyond Conspiracy."

Jennings also had a particular interest in broadcasting for the next generation. He did

 numerous live news specials for children on subjects ranging from growing up in the

age of AIDS, to prejudice and its effects on our society. After the events of September 11,

and again on the first anniversary, he anchored a town hall meeting for children and parents

 entitled, "Answering Children's Questions."

Jennings was honored with many awards for news reporting, including 16 Emmys, two

George Foster Peabody Awards, several Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards

and several Overseas Press Club Awards. Most recently, "World News Tonight" was

 recognized with two consecutive Edward R. Murrow awards for best newscast, based

on field reporting done by Jennings on the California wildfires and the transfer of power in Iraq.

Jennings was the author, with Todd Brewster, of the acclaimed New York Times best seller,

 "The Century." It featured first-person accounts of the great events of the century.

In 1999, he anchored the 12-hour ABC series, "The Century," and ABC's series for

 The History Channel, "America's Time." He and Brewster also published "In Search

 of America," a companion book for the six-part ABC News series.

Friends Remember Peter Jennings

ABC News' Colleagues Talk About Their Memories of Jennings

Aug. 8, 2005 --  Colleagues of Peter Jennings remembered him

fondly today. Here are some of their words:

"Nightline" anchor Ted Koppel: He and I joked the last time I went to visit him a few

days ago that between the two of us, we'd put in 83 years at ABC News. … But I do feel

the need to say that he was a warm and loving and surprisingly sentimental man. … For

the rest of his life, and I do mean for the rest of his life, he always regretted the fact that

 he had dropped out of school, and he used to travel when he was overseas with whatever

 else he needed for his trip and always, he had with him one extra suitcase that was filled

with books. He was a student for the rest of his life, even though he had dropped out so early.

Barbara Walters: No one could ad-lib like Peter. Sometimes he drove me crazy because

he knew every detail and I would find myself saying, 'But … but … .' But he really did.

You would think it was all scripted, he was so poetic. But it wasn't. … He just died too young.

 And if as Ted gave the message [to] finish high school, I want to give a message: If you have

kids who are smoking, for heaven's sake, tell them that we lost Peter.

"Good Morning America" anchor Diane Sawyer: When I first arrived here at ABC and

walked in, and he was on a special report about the Middle East, and he told the cameraman

to turn around because, he said, I know that if you go two streets over, there's a cafe there.

 And look behind that cafe and there's a park and the trees are there. And I'm thinking,

'I am so out of my league. I've got to leave immediately.' It's customary to say, 'He will

not come again.' Peter Jennings will not come again.

"Good Morning America" anchor Charles Gibson: He was our anchor, our mainstay, off

 the air as well as on. Peter could transform confusion into clarity and make exercise

appear effortless. He set standards for us, and he never stopped raising them as he

helped audiences understand the major events of our time.

Peter Jennings -- 'World News Tonight' Anchor

Peter Jennings is the anchor and senior editor of ABC's "World News Tonight"

 where he has established a reputation for independence and excellence in broadcast

journalism. He is the network's principal anchor for breaking news, election coverage

and special events.

As one of America's most distinguished journalists, Peter Jennings has reported many

of the pivotal events that have shaped our world. He was in Berlin in the 1960s when the

 Berlin Wall was going up, and there in the '90s when it came down. He covered the civil

 rights movement in the southern United States during the 1960s, and the struggle for equality

 in South Africa during the 1970s and '80s. He was there when the Voting Rights Act was

signed in 1965, and on the other side of the world when South Africans voted for the first time.

He has worked in every European nation that once was behind the Iron Curtain. He was there

when the independent political movement Solidarity was born in a Polish shipyard, and again

when Poland's communist leaders were forced from power. And he was in Hungary, Czechoslovakia,

East Germany, Romania and throughout the Soviet Union to record first the repression of

communism and then its demise. He was one of the first reporters to go to Vietnam in the

1960s, and went back to the killing fields of Cambodia in the 1980s to remind Americans

that, unless they did something, the terror would return.

In broadcast journalism, Peter Jennings has a reputation for putting the most complex

and difficult issues on the agenda when others have largely ignored them. From his early

days in the Middle East and South Africa, to the contemporary challenges in Africa and the

former Soviet Union, on education, health care and tobacco — these are issues with which

Mr. Jennings' stewardship at "World News Tonight" and his special series,

"Peter Jennings Reporting," have been associated.

He is the author, with Todd Brewster, of the acclaimed New York Times bestseller,

 "The Century." Structured as an epic tale about "ourselves," it is a lavish book that features

astonishing first-person accounts of the great events of the century. In 1999, he anchored

 the 12-hour ABC series, "The Century," and ABC's series for The History Channel,

"America's Time." He and Mr. Brewster also published "In Search of America,"

 a companion book for the 6-part ABC News series.

On December 31, 1999, Mr. Jennings anchored ABC's Peabody-award winning coverage

 of Millennium Eve, "ABC 2000." 175 million Americans watched the telecast, making it

the biggest live global television event ever. "The day belonged to ABC News," praised

 The Washington Post, "… with Peter Jennings doing a nearly superhuman job of anchoring

." Mr. Jennings was the only anchor to appear live for 25 consecutive hours.

Mr. Jennings led the Network's coverage of the September 11 attacks and America's

subsequent war on terrorism. He anchored more than 60 hours that week during the

Network's longest continuous period of news coverage, and was widely praised for

providing a reassuring voice during the time of crisis. TV Guide called him "the center

 of gravity," while the Washington Post wrote, "Jennings, in his shirt sleeves, did a

Herculean job of coverage." The coverage earned ABC News Peabody and duPont awards.

Mr. Jennings joined ABC News on August 3, 1964. He served as the anchor of the

 "Peter Jennings with the News" from 1965 to 1967.

Jennings established the first American television news bureau in the Arab world in

1968 when he served as ABC News' bureau chief for Beirut, Lebanon, a position he

 held for seven years. He helped put ABC News on the map in 1972 with his coverage of

 the Summer Olympics in Munich, when Arab terrorists took Israeli athletes hostage.

In 1975, Mr. Jennings moved to Washington to become the news anchor of ABC's

 morning program "A.M. America". After a short stint in the mornings, Mr. Jennings

returned overseas to Rome where he stayed before moving to London to become

ABC's Chief Foreign Correspondent. In 1978 he was named the foreign desk anchor for

 "World News Tonight." He co-anchored the program with Frank Reynolds in

 Washington, D.C., and Max Robinson in Chicago until 1983.

Mr. Jennings was named anchor and senior editor of "World News Tonight" in 1983.

In his more than 20 years in the position he has been honored with almost every

major award given to television journalists.

His extensive domestic and overseas reporting experience has proven to be invaluable

during "World News Tonight's" coverage of major crises. He has reported from all 50

states and locations around the globe. During the 1991 Gulf War and the 2003 War in

 Iraq, his knowledge of Middle Eastern affairs brought invaluable perspective to

ABC News' coverage. Mr. Jennings has interviewed the most important national

 and international figures of our time and has anchored the ABC News coverage

of every major national election since 1984.

In "Peter Jennings Reporting," which debuted in 1990, Mr. Jennings covers challenging

 issues in depth during primetime television. Millions watched the critically acclaimed

"The Search for Jesus" in 2000 and "Jesus and Paul — the Word and the Witness" in 2004.

 "Peter Jennings Reporting" has also focused extensively on international news, with

specials on tense relations between India and Pakistan, the conflict in Bosnia, the crisis in

 Haiti, the war in Iraq and the drug trade in Central and South America. The series has

also tackled important domestic issues such as gun control policy, the politics of abortion,

the crisis in funding for the arts and a highly praised chronicle of the accused bombers

of Oklahoma City. "Peter Jennings Reporting" has earned numerous awards, including the

 2004 Edward R. Morrow award for best documentary for "The Kennedy Assassination

— Beyond Conspiracy."

Mr. Jennings has a particular interest in broadcasting for the next generation. He has done

 numerous live news specials for children on subjects ranging from growing up in the age of

 AIDS, to prejudice and its effects on our society. After the events of September 11, and

again on the first anniversary, he anchored a town hall meeting for children and parents

 entitled, "Answering Children's Questions."

Mr. Jennings has been honored with many awards for news reporting, including 16 Emmys,

two George Foster Peabody Awards, several Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards

 and several Overseas Press Club Awards. Most recently, "World News Tonight"

was recognized with two consecutive Edward R. Murrow awards for best newscast,

 based on field reporting done by Mr. Jennings on the California wildfires and the

transfer of power in Iraq.

He resides in Manhattan with his wife, Kayce Freed. He has two children Elizabeth,

 25 and Christopher, 23.

July 29, 2005: Jennings Says 'Many Thanks' for Birthday Wishes

July 29, 2005 — In response to the flurry of warm wishes that have been posted on

 the ABCNEWS.com message board in celebration of Peter Jennings' 67th birthday,

 the veteran anchor offers this note of appreciation:

"Many thanks to all of you for your birthday wishes.

Your words — as always — are a great source of strength.

I am celebrating today with my family — we are all grateful.

Peter"

July 8, 2005: Jennings Offers Thoughts on London Attacks

July 8, 2005 Friday night's broadcast of "World News Tonight" closed with thoughts

on this week's terror attacks in London from Peter Jennings, who spent more than 15

 years working and living in the city.

The following note was read on the air by substitute anchor Charles Gibson

"We are all Londoners this week. And, once again, we are stronger for it. I recognize

 that eloquent, stoic determination never to give up, as Winston Churchill said during

the War. I have been in London and other British cities when they've been attacked

 with unrestrained violence. The perpetrators have always been the losers. On behalf

of all my colleagues at ABC News who did such a terrific job covering this story, goodnight."

April 29, 2005: Peter Jennings Thanks Viewers for Support

April 29, 2005 ABC News' "World News Tonight" anchor Peter Jennings in a letter

 written today thanked those who have offered their support and get-well wishes

 following his diagnosis of lung cancer.

Jennings, 66, announced the diagnosis earlier this month and has been undergoing

 chemotherapy treatments on an outpatient basis.

"Thousands of you have spoiled me rotten with your attention in the last couple

 of weeks," he wrote. "Whether you have a cancer connection or not, your anecdotes,

 mementos, home recipes, and general all-purpose guidance and concern have

all been so deeply appreciated. I hope you know.

"So many experiences have meant something special," Jennings added. "A woman in my

 building, who is a cancer survivor, showed up at our front door so that we could

see that bald really is beautiful. She's right."

Jennings also made note of advice he received from Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., who

revealed in February that he has been diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease.

"Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania wrote me a note to say that the only way to

get through chemo is to 'work your way through it,' " Jennings said. "He's a tougher

 man than I am. I assume there are a few others out there who, like me, are going

with the flow until the day gets better."

He continued: "Incidentally, Hamilton Jordan, former Chief of Staff in the Carter

Administration, sent me his book 'No Such Thing as a Bad Day.' He's had cancer

 four times. He tells me, as have many others, that when it gets really bad, it will

get better. Phew!"

Jennings ended his letter with a mention of jazz bassist Percy Heath, who succumbed

 to cancer this week.

"And finally, if you would, add a friend of mine to your prayers. The jazz legend

Percy Heath, whose bass anchored the Modern Jazz Quartet for four decades, died of bone

 cancer on Sunday. He was 81 and we will sure miss him."

The text of Jennings' letter was posted on ABCNEWS.com's message board and portions

were read on tonight's broadcast of "World News Tonight with Peter Jennings."

He will continue to anchor the broadcast as his health permits. Charles Gibson, Elizabeth

Vargas and others have been substituting in his absence.

Jennings was named anchor and senior editor of "World News Tonight" in 1983.

 He has worked for ABC News since 1964.

In his more than 40 years with ABC News, Jennings has been honored with many

awards for news reporting including 14 national Emmys, two Peabody Awards, several

Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards and several Overseas Press Club Awards.

Letter From Peter Jennings  World News Tonight' Anchor Thanks Well-Wishers for

 Their Support

April 29, 2005 Following is the text of a letter from "World News Tonight" anchor

Peter Jennings to thank all those who have offered their good wishes since he was

 diagnosed with lung cancer.

Yesterday I decided to go to the office; I live only a few blocks away. I got as far as the

bedroom door. Chemo strikes.

Do I detect a knowing but sympathetic smile on many of your faces? You knew

 this was coming.

Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania wrote me a note to say that the only way to

 get through chemo is to "work your way through it." He's a tougher man than I am.

I assume there are a few others out there who, like me, are going with the flow until

the day gets better.

Incidentally, Hamilton Jordan, former Chief of Staff in the Carter Administration, sent

 me his book "No Such Thing as a Bad Day." He's had cancer four times. He tells me,

 as have many others, that when it gets really bad, it will get better. Phew!

Thousands of you have spoiled me rotten with your attention in the last couple of weeks.

Whether you have a cancer connection or not, your anecdotes, mementos, home recipes,

 and general all-purpose guidance and concern have all been so deeply appreciated.

 I hope you know.

So many experiences have meant something special. A woman in my building, who is a

cancer survivor, showed up at our front door so that we could see that bald really is

beautiful. She's right.

I won't soon forget an encounter as I was leaving the hospital. A middle-aged couple

was going into the building and as they passed me, I heard my name and turned. The

 woman stepped right into my face and said, "Me too. Lung cancer." Instinctively,

 immediately, we gave each other a hug … a real hug … and went on our respective

 ways knowing that we had been strengthened by the connection.

So thank you for all of the connections. And finally, if you would, add a friend of mine

 to your prayers. The jazz legend Percy Heath, whose bass anchored the

Modern Jazz Quartet for four decades, died of bone cancer on Sunday.

 He was 81 and we will sure miss him.

As always,

Peter

ABC NEWS LINK'S RIGHT HERE IN RED JUST PICK ONE 

http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/PeterJennings/

ABC NEWS  OF PETER JENNINGS HERE LINKS RIGHT HERE

 

Koppel Remembers Jennings  NEWS STORY

Peter Jennings: In the Field  PHOTO’S

Peter Jennings' Interviews  PHOTO’S

Post Your Thoughts  ON ABC NEWS 

Friends Remember Peter Jennings  NEWS STORY

July 29, 2005: Jennings Says 'Many Thanks' for Birthday Wishes  NEWS STORY

 

July 8, 2005: Jennings Offers Thoughts on London Attacks   NEWS STORY

April 29, 2005: Peter Jennings Thanks Viewers for Support   NEWS STORY

Peter Jennings Dies at 67  NEWS STORY 

 

Friends Remember Peter Jennings   NEWS  STORY

Peter Jennings -- 'World News Tonight' Anchor  NEWS  STORY

TO SEE PHOTO’S OF PETER PLEASE GO TO THIS LINK’S HERE

    Peter Jennings: In the Field LINK HERE

http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/popup?id=1017800 PHOTOS

    Peter Jennings' Interviews

http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/popup?id=1018084  PHOTO’S

 

      http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/Jennings/   ABC NEWS WEB SITE OF PETTER JENNINGS

 

Viewers Reflect on Peter Jennings  NEWS STORY

 

Post Your Thoughts   WEB BLOG ON ABC NEWS ABOUT PETTER

 

A Tribute to Peter Jennings  PHOTO’S WITH NEWS

 

Friends Remember Peter Jennings  NEWS  STORY

 

GMA Anchors Recall Peter Jennings   NEWS STORY

 

UFOs -- Seeing Is Believing: Full Coverage  NEWS  PAGE ALL ABOUT UFO NEWS

 

Iraq: Where Things Stand    NEWS PAGE  ABOUT THE IRAQ WAR

 

Fast Facts on Lung Cancer   NEWS  STORY

 

FDA Reneges on Lung Cancer Drug, Urges Other Options    NEWS  STORY

 

Lung Cancer Hits Young, Non-Smoking Women   NEWS  STORY

 

Lung Cancer Is the No. 1 Cancer Killer   NEWS  STORY

 

Full Coverage: Lung Cancer   NEWS  STORY

 

Peter Jennings Dies at 67   NEWS  STORY

 

Former Friendly Rivals Remember Jennings   NEWS  STORY

 

Dignitaries Recall Jennings as 'Consummate Reporter'   NEWS  STORY

 

Tribute Funds for Peter Jennings     NEWS  STORY WITH WEB SITE LINK’S

 

Tribute Funds for Peter Jennings

 Anchor's Family Asks Well-Wishers to Consider

 Donating to Groups He Supported

Aug. 8, 2005 — If you would like to show support, in lieu of flowers,

Peter Jennings' family asks that you contribute to one of the

organizations that he supported, worked for and believed in deeply:

Coalition for the Homeless
129 Fulton Street
New York, NY 10038

(212) 776-2002
Attn: Mary Brosnahan Sullivan
http://www.coalitionforthehomeless.org/

Women In Need
115 West 31st Street
New York, NY 10001
(212) 695-4758
Attn: Robin White
http://www.women-in-need.org/index.html

Teach For America
315 West 36th Street
6th Floor
New York, NY 10018
(212) 279-2080
Attn: Wendy Kopp
http://www.teachforamerica.org/flash_movie.html

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Lung Cancer Research Fund
Make checks out to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Thoracic Research Fund
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospital
1275 York Avenue
Room H1018
New York, NY 10021
Or donate online and specify the program
http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/12876.cfm

Peter Jennings' Thoughts From Iraq

asting Impressions From Iraq's Historic Elections

BAGHDAD, Iraq, Jan. 31, 2005 — It goes with age,

and we must have said it two dozen times to senior officers:

U.S. soldiers and Marines are so young.

Every day was full of meeting baby-faced U.S. soldiers from across

 the country. On our last patrol in Baghdad, the hands on a .50-caliber

weapon belonged to a woman who looked younger than my 20-something-year-old daughter.

Their commander said they are all much better trained than the Vietnam generation.

There is a tremendous esprit de corps — and when a reporter puts his life in their

 hands, as reporters do every day — one can understand why some people are

 concerned that embedding with troops may have an effect on objectivity.

These days, given the country's instability, it's the only way to see the country.

In the nine days we spent in the country, the troops weren't inclined to talk politics.

The Bush administration need not pass down talking points to the young men and

women we encountered. Most of them knew that reporters are a form of foreign life,

 and they treated us appropriately.

Talking about the nuts and bolts of the daily mission is another thing — it's the pure

 life and death of what they do.

'Live on Danger'

It wasn't politically correct for an older soldier to say it, but he did: "The kids live on

the danger, and they love it."

They die on it too, and that's one of the reasons why Sunday morning chapel is so well-attended.

Religious services were always crowded. A man praying on his knees with a weapon on his

 shoulder is an incongruous sight. In a region where religion is such a motivator, we thought

of President Lincoln's remark: "It's not so much whether God is on our side, but whether we

are on God's side."

Finally, on almost any patrol, one realizes that the soldiers are very much alone in a world

they cannot expect to understand.

The culture is simply out of reach without the language. They never take their helmets off,

 though they are understanding that looking a man in the eye is better without the reflective sunglasses.

Counting the Days

One thing that all soldiers have in common — they count the days.

If they've just arrived, they count how long they've been in the country. If they are near the

end of their tour, they count how long they have to go.

It is, of course, the big question — how long will it be before the Iraqis are able to defend

themselves? The war is far from over.

Inside Iraq's Notorious Abu Ghraib Prison

U.S. Soldiers Work to Restore Prison's Image,

 America's Credibility

BAGHDAD, Iraq, Jan. 28, 2005 — Some of the U.S. soldiers assigned

 to Iraq's notorious Abu Ghraib prison admit they have a funny feeling when they

first arrive. No one seems quite sure what to make of the abuse and humiliation

 of prisoners at the hands of U.S. military police. Thousands of photos documenting

 the abuse were seen across the world last year.

Today, Abu Ghraib houses 3,060 prisoners. Upon our entry, U.S. soldiers quickly

told us the detainees are treated according to the Geneva Conventions. There is no

 torture, the system has been fixed and oversight is appropriate now, they said.

 U.S. officers seemed slightly defensive at first — as if a reporter wanted only to dwell

on the scandal, which, of course, is unavoidable. We were not permitted to show the

prisoners' faces, nor could we question them directly. But while we were in the company

 of Col. James Brown — commander of the Military Police Brigade and a former professor

of languages at West Point — his apparent interest in their welfare granted us access.

Abu Ghraib is comprised of five different levels of detention, level five being the toughest.

We saw only level one, reserved for those with good behavior.

As we walked past, many detainees worked hard to attract our attention.

Innocent Prisoners Housed With Killers

Visitors to Abu Ghraib often have a common first impression: Some of the prisoners must be

 innocent, and some of them want to kill us. Brown agrees it makes for ambiguous tension.

At one point during our visit, a fight broke out among the prisoners, seriously injuring one

 prisoner. The military police say fighting is rare, though there is tension in a prison population

that has everything from common criminals to Islamic extremists.

Within a few minutes, the injured man ended up in a first-class field hospital. Last November,

 the hospital's American doctors and nurses treated Marines from the nearby battle of Fallujah.

 Today, a prisoner is treated simply as another patient, and he gets the best of what America

has to offer.

Many soldiers we encountered told us that part of their mission at Abu Ghraib was to restore

America's honor, if they could.

Surveying Changes in Southern Iraq

Region More Secure, Optimistic Than North

BAGHDAD, Iraq, Jan. 28, 2005 — The most dangerous part of reporting in the Shiite

 heartland of southern Iraq is getting there. It is dangerously out of reach to U.S.

reporters based in Baghdad.

When we first measured "where things stand" in Iraq more than a year ago, troubles

seemed to fade away on the drive south from the capital. Today, the word is that

 insurgents will pay $1,000 to anyone who kills a Shiite, $2,000 for a journalist

 and $3,000 for an American soldier.

We found overall that people were living a much more secure life in the southern part

of Iraq. The reasons offered by Iraqis are many: Local tribes have a better handle

 on affairs, people are inclined to cooperate with the police, there is less antagonism

to Americans, and there are very few Americans to begin with.

Physically, life is only somewhat better than in the region around Baghdad. Since the

 invasion, there has been a terrible shortage of electricity and clean water.

In the town of Hilla, people have been waiting for gas for days, sleeping and eating in

 their cars.They have been waiting so long that local entrepreneurs now cater

specifically to the gas lines.

Adnan Alwan blames the police. They take bribes, he says, to let people jump the lines.

Nearly two years after the Americans invaded, many Iraqis still don't understand how a

technological giant, such as the United States, cannot produce more gasoline in a country

that has so much oil.

Abdul Ameer owns a brick making factory in Al Muthene province. When Saddam

 Hussein was in power, he says, there were no fuel shortages, it cost less and bandits

 never bothered him.

Optimism in Southern Iraq

But many Iraqis in the south were optimistic, even if they didn't offer up a very specific

 reason.

In Amara, near the Iranian border, people are very poor. The school has only 50

 desks for 150 children, but the Shiites hated Saddam so much that, in his absence,

many of them think they're moving forward.

There is an underlying feeling here that when the Shiites vote next weekend, their power

is going to get a boost.

Chafit Sharrad, who can't make enough money to support his family, says he loves

 President Bush. The war in Iraq is part of what he calls a "Bush revolution" —

and he means it as a compliment.

Dates were once Iraq's second largest export after oil, but war and neglect took

 a terrible toll. Today in the south, farmers are planting thousands of date palm seedlings.

It's an investment in the future, since the trees do not bear fruit for seven years.

In southern Iraq, there is faith in the future.

Peter Jennings filed this report for "World News Tonight."

Surveying Changes in Northern Iraq

Complicated, Critical Region Shows

 Limited Signs of Success

BAGHDAD, Iraq, Jan. 27, 2005 — From the moment U.S. forces arrived in Iraq, they

found a measure of support in the northern part of the country.

The Kurds — a non-Arab, Middle Eastern minority who live in the north — have had a

 long American connection. Kurds suffered terribly under Saddam Hussein and were

thankful when Americans removed him from power.

With little interference, the Kurdish regions have generally flourished — commerce is

 booming and salaries have increased. We witnessed a bridge being built in Kirkuk and

a college graduation ceremony for journalists in Sulaymaniyah.

But there are some ominous signs, as well, since we last visited the region a year ago.

Arab insurgents have sabotaged oil installations in Kirkuk, the center of the Iraqi oil

 industry, with increasing frequency. There is also tension throughout the region

between Kurds, Arabs and traditional Turkish nomads called Turkomen.

A year ago, Mosul appeared to us to be a success story. But now, some say Kurds

 and Sunni Arabs won't even cross the Tigris River into each other's neighborhoods.

Without the presence of the Iraqi army and with most of the civil service unemployed,

 thousands of young men now have no work.

Insurgents want Iraqis to blame Americans for the region's problems; we found it too

 dangerous to do any interviews on the streets.

At a secondary school for girls in Kirkuk, several students were kidnapped in the fall,

and they have not returned.

"My mother stands in the door every day," said 17-year-old Rand Ahmed,

"waiting for me to come home."

It wasn't this way a year ago.

There are small signs of change, however. We found a park in Sulaymaniyah at

 the former site of a prison.

"It was," said resident Mohammed Rasheed, "a mass grave, and we thank Bush for

helping us get rid of Saddam."

We were encouraged by Garzad Mohammed, an Iraqi whom we met in Kirkuk.

"After the elections," he said, "the mess will settle down."

Kurds will turn out to vote and win more power, he said. He was "a hundred

 percent sure of it."

Peter Jennings filed this report for "World News Tonight."

Courage on Display in Northern Iraqi City

Election Workers, U.S. Soldiers Risk Lives

 in Dangerous Mosul

MOSUL, Iraq, Jan. 27, 2005 — At the Joint Command Center in Mosul,

potential election workers were lined up and ready to work — dangerous

 work that could cost them their lives if the Iraq insurgency discovers their identities.

Insurgents have declared open war on the Iraqi election process. This week,

they captured three men who worked for the Iraqi Electoral Commission in Mosul.

So why would anyone put their lives at stake?

"This is my country," said one Iraqi election worker. "I must do my duty," said another.

The money is a factor as well. Election workers will make $500 for a few days' work

 in a city where more than half the men are unemployed.

Under the gaze of U.S. soldiers, the Iraqis were given a short lesson on how to vote.

On Sunday, they will be at the polling places teaching others.

Shadowing Army's Stryker Brigade

The Iraqi election workers weren't the only brave men we encountered. A U.S. Army

Stryker Brigade Combat Team, based in Fort Lewis, Wash., arrived in Mosul after

 the U.S.-trained Iraqi police and soldiers failed to fight insurgent attacks.

Battalion commander Capt. Blake Lackey, 34, led a convoy as we headed out for

a forward base in a not-too-distant neighborhood. The vehicle was equipped with

slatted sides, designed to defend against rocket-propelled grenades. The ride,

 however, was largely uneventful.

In what used to be a government office, we met the Iraqi soldiers with whom the

U.S. forces try to control the neighborhood. But they were all Kurdish fighters —

 non-Arabs — brought in from farther north. Many Iraqi Arabs think the Kurds are

 becoming an American militia, and relations between Kurds and Arabs in Mosul

 are very poor.

We went up to the roof to look out on the sprawling neighborhood. Reminded very

quickly that insurgents are everywhere, U.S. soldiers killed a man who was shooting

rom a nearby roof.

"The election is going to make a huge difference to the people of Iraq," said Lackey.

 "It's going to make a huge difference to the people in my area of operations. It's

been indicated to me — just on the street — people want the election to come and

people are ready to get on with their lives and have the insurgency stop."

Another day in Mosul means another struggle.

Peter Jennings filed this report for "World News Tonight."

nspecting Coalition Readiness Before

Iraq ElectionsPeter Jennings Shadows U.S.   

Commanding General in Iraq

BAGHDAD, Iraq, Jan. 26, 2005 — Army Gen. George Casey, the U.S. commanding

general in Iraq, is charged with the responsibility of ensuring that Iraq's historic

elections are not deemed a failure.

"We'll see what they've got," Casey said of the insurgents as he worked a 17-hour day,

 overseeing security to protect potential Iraqi voters.

"We've told our guys to be as invisible as you can," he said. "And then moving from the

 polling station out, your choices [of security forces] are: Iraqi police, Iraqi National

Guard, Iraqi army, the Insurgent Protection Service, and the last resort is coalition forces."

Casey spent the day in the field, visiting coalition forces and determining their readiness.

 In Diwaniyeh, located in central Iraq, Polish troops told him they expected to be ready

 for Sunday's elections.

Unbeknownst to Casey, though, an Iraqi government minister had created two new Iraqi

battalions to be stationed in town, but they don't have any weapons or radios. The Iraqi

official had assumed the United States would provide them. After listening for an hour,

 a flurry of Polish and American officers got back on his helicopter and moved on,

hoping to find a solution later.

'The First Time They Have a Choice'

Casey says he believes that most Iraqis want to vote: "We liberated them, but this is

the first time they have a choice."

Farther east in al Kut, near the Iranian border, Casey sat through an interminable

 briefing from Ukrainian forces. They also claim to be ready; the ballots have arrived

 and are being kept under lock and key.

After the head of the local election committee and the local police chief were ushered

into the meeting, they issued long lists of requests for weapons, trucks and Internet

 service. It is unlikely the requests will be granted in time for the elections.

Casey wants the Iraqis to defend themselves, but most say they don't have enough

weapons and ammunition.

"What we need to do is to work with them to bring them to the levels where they

are capable of doing it first with little support from us and then doing it by themselves,

" Casey said. "The way we talk about it with the Iraqis is, 'Right now, the coalition is

in the lead with the counterinsurgency and the Iraqis are in support.' And what we want

to do over next year is to reverse that. And I think that is entirely possible."

Casey's trip has been partly a listening tour and partly a way to show the coalition forces

and Iraqis that he cares. While he knows that reshaping Iraq is beyond his capability, he

also knows that the future of Iraq depends on a successful election.

Peter Jennings filed this report for "World News Tonight."

Reconstruction Slow in Central Iraq

Quality-of-Life Improvements

Needed to Boost Optimism

BAGHDAD, Iraq, Jan. 25, 2005 — Taxi driver Abdul Hasan al Saidi ticked off the

problems as he drove through Baghdad — the garbage isn't collected, the sewage

 problems are enormous, and law and order are nonexistent.

But many Iraqis we encountered in central Iraq hang on to shreds of optimism. Al Saidi

said he is hopeful: he and his family plan to vote in the country's historic election.

In the parts of Iraq with tangible quality of life improvements, people are more optimistic.

New water pipes and paving in the Baghdad slum known as Sadr City haven't gone unnoticed.

 Whatever they think of Americans, the Shiite residents of the giant city-within-a-city need

all the help they can get.

But in Baghdad's Shula neighborhood, lousy plumbing equals pessimism.

"We've had overflowing sewage here for six days!" said one angry resident.

"We call the local officials. They haven't fixed anything!"

One Step Forward, One Step Back

At a school in Sadr City, the children and teachers would be one step forward if

the sewage were removed from the school yard. In many parts of central Iraq,

 that's the way things are: one step forward and one step back.

Since the U.S. invasion, the staff at Baghdad's Special Institute for Handicapped

Children has had more money for physical improvements. But the building sits

close to Haifa Street — often the site of fighting between U.S. forces and Iraqi insurgents.

The students are understandably scared when they hear the sound of gunshots

and low-flying helicopters. Last week, when a bomb exploded nearby, the children

 fled the lunchroom in a panic. While there was no damage to the building, the

psychological damage to the children was immense.

It is hard for Americans to comprehend the level of violence. Central Iraq has seen

the worst of it since the start of the war. We heard the same thing today that we

 heard during our visit last summer: "When Saddam Hussein was in power, this

never would have happened."

Peter Jennings filed this report for "World News Tonight."

Peter Jennings Travels With 1st Cavalry

 Division Famed Army Unit Faces

Challenges While Stabilizing Baghdad

BAGHDAD, Iraq, Jan. 24, 2005 — At the U.S. Army's 1st Cavalry Division

headquarters in Baghdad this morning, Gen. Peter Chiarelli heard in detail

what he already knew — the level of violence has decreased in the last several days.

 Aggressive soldiering by the U.S. forces, insurgents possibly biding their time and

 the weather could all be contributing factors.

Today, a suicide bomber blew up a carload of explosives outside the headquarters

 of Prime Minister Iyad Allawi's party offices in central Baghdad, wounding at least

 10 people. After hearing word of the latest blast, Chiarelli said many explosive

devices used by insurgents this month are less sophisticated than those seen in the

 past. The hope is that the U.S. military is putting put some of the better insurgent bomb

 makers out of business.

Traveling by chopper to the eastern side of the Tigris River — mostly Shiite Muslim

 territory — Peter Jennings and an ABC News crew went on patrol with American

soldiers in the town of Obaidy.

Young children crowded the street. Some of the insurgents have turned out to be

teenagers, only slightly older than these children. But Capt. Mathew Boddini says

 he feels completely comfortable on foot.

Americans are ready targets in many places, but today there is no apparent antagonism.

The U.S. military has fought running battles with Shiites since last summer. But the

 Shiites are expected to win power at the ballot box on Sunday, so they may be

reluctant to fight the powerful Americans on the street today.

U.S. Leads Reconstruction Effort

The town looks pretty bad, made to seem worse by a dreary day and recent rain. The

United States is spending millions of dollars on the reconstruction of sewer pipes,

sewage treatment, landfills for garbage and providing clean water. Some wonder if the

 U.S. efforts at improving Iraqi life will make a difference.

Every U.S. officer encountered today said the media has missed or under-reported

 the reconstruction aspect of the U.S. mission.

Iraq's election is surrounded by much fear because the insurgency has intimidated

millions of people. The polling places are still secret, and some electoral workers

have already been assassinated.

At one point of entry in Baghdad's International Zone — where international embassies

are housed — the U.S. method for keeping suicide bombers at bay is evident. The

 concrete barriers get higher and deeper.

The process to gain access to the area is more sophisticated and demanding, since

10,000 Iraqis come and go to work in the fortified zone every day.

When asked what the rest of the week before the election will hold, Chiarelli will

 not make any predictions.

Peter Jennings filed this report for "World News Tonight."

Former Friendly Rivals Remember Jennin

Former Anchors Tom Brokaw and

 Dan Rather Recall 'Competitive Brotherhood'

Aug. 8, 2005 — In the competitive world of television news, they were rivals, news

 anchors of the three most prominent networks. But Peter Jennings, Tom Brokaw

and Dan Rather had a common bond and mutual respect that forged their friendship.

Watch ABC News' special tribute to Peter Jennings on "Primetime" on Tuesday

 at 8 p.m. ET.

"We were not just competitors and colleagues. We were really friends," said Brokaw,

 reflecting on Jennings, who died Sunday of lung cancer at age 67. "We had a lot of

 opportunities to reflect on this in the last year. … It was a competitive brotherhood."

In the past year, television viewers have seen the end of an era as they have said

goodbye to Brokaw, Rather and Jennings. Brokaw retired as anchor of "NBC Nightly

News" in December after almost 23 years in the anchor chair, while Rather signed off

as head of "CBS Evening News" after 24 years this past March. In April, Jennings

announced on "World News Tonight" that he was pulling away from his duties as he

 was battling lung cancer.

Rivalry Forges Brotherhood and Friendship

Jennings was named anchor and senior editor of "World News Tonight" in September

 1983, completing the trio of anchors that dominated network news for more than two

 decades. Rather began his run as anchor of in March 1981, while Brokaw was named

 anchor in April 1982, initially sharing the title with Roger Mudd. Brokaw and Rather

respected Jennings' journalistic reputation and his desire to give viewers all sides of

every story.

"Inside that tall, handsome, elegant and eloquent exterior — inside that beat the heart

 of a fierce, but principled competitor," said Rather. "The last person you wanted to

 see coming on a story, particularly a big story, was Peter Jennings. … How much did

 I keep an eye on him? Constantly. All the time."

However, that rivalry and a common passion for news that was accurate, insightful

and balanced made Brokaw, Rather and Jennings friends. They shared stories about

being news anchors that only they could understand and pushed each other —

and their broadcasts — to be better.

We had been together on so many big stories over the last 30 years of our careers,

" Brokaw said. "And Peter especially, I think, summarized for all of us the feelings

 that Dan and I have — the three of us have — when people often ask, 'Are you

friends?' And Peter said, 'Yes, we are friends because we don't see each other that

often.' … And then he went on to say that we've all made each other better."

Sometimes viewers saw raw emotion from the Canadian-born anchor. They saw

Jennings choke up during coverage of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks as he mentioned

getting calls from his two grown children, Elizabeth and Christopher, and they saw

him struggle when he announced to the "World News Tonight" audience on April 5

 that he was battling lung cancer.

Brokaw and Rather indicated that that reflected who Jennings was. Jennings, they

said, was at heart a reporter who learned the importance of giving stories perspective.

He was not truly comfortable being referred to as the star for a news division.

"Peter took his work very seriously, but he did not take himself seriously," Rather said.

 "And he was a little uncomfortable — very uncomfortable — with the word 'star' and a

little uncomfortable with the word 'anchor' because he really did think about himself

 as a reporter."

That was something else Brokaw, Rather and Jennings seemed to have in common:

They thought of themselves as reporters first and did not stay anchored in a studio.

Jennings normally traveled around the world to cover stories and, when he didn't

journey to Asia to cover the aftermath of the tsunami disaster months before his

 cancer diagnosis, media insiders and viewers noticed.

"It's customary to say, 'He will not come again,'" said "Good Morning America"

anchor Diane Sawyer. "Peter Jennings will not come again."

Dignitaries Recall Jennings as 'Consummate

Reporter'  President Bush, Statesmen and

Members of Congress Remember Peter Jennings

Aug. 8, 2005 Newsmakers and dignitaries remembered Peter Jennings fondly

today. Here are some of their words:

President Bush: Laura and I were saddened to learn about the death of Peter Jennings.

 Peter Jennings had a long and distinguished career as a news journalist. He covered

 many important events, events that helped define the world as we know it today. A

lot of Americans relied upon Peter Jennings for their news. He became a part of the

 life of a lot of our fellow citizens, and he will be missed. May God bless his soul.

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell: Peter Jennings was a great man and the

consummate professional. His reassuring presence will be missed by all of us.

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice: I am saddened by the death of my close, personal

friend Peter Jennings. To Peter's wife and family, we offer our deepest sympathies and

 heartfelt condolences. He will be deeply missed. Peter Jennings represented all that was

 best in journalism and public service. A man of conscience and integrity, his reporting

was a guide to all of us who aspire to better the world around us. I learned from him and

was inspired by him.

Massachusetts senator and former presidential candidate John Kerry: One of the final

long interviews I did during the campaign last year was with Peter Jennings in Des Moines.

 I will always remember his insight, his ability to explain the most complicated issues in the

clearest form, and his grace and style. He was a tough interviewer but he was always fair.

 I enjoyed our conversations about politics and especially hockey. Peter Jennings put his

 own brand on broadcast journalism. He will be greatly missed.

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi: All Americans are grateful for Peter Jennings'

 distinguished and trusted news broadcasts. The consummate reporter, Mr. Jennings

worked hard to get the story and get it right, and Americans admired that he did it with grace

and dignity. It is with great sadness and respect that I extend deepest condolences to Mr.

Jennings' family, friends, and colleagues at ABC News. I hope it is a comfort to his family

that so many people share their loss and are praying for them at this sad time.

Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin: It was with great sorrow that Sheila and I learned

of the death of Peter Jennings yesterday. Born in Toronto, Peter Jennings will be remembered

 as one of America's most inspirational and distinguished journalists of our times … All through

 his life, he devoted time and energy in educating children about the world, and he has been

honored with many awards for his reporting and documentaries. He will continue to be a

 source of inspiration for generations of young reporters to come.

Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani: Peter Jennings was a gentleman. Even

when asking the tough, insightful questions, he did so in a gentlemanly fashion. He was

 able to find the weakness in an argument and point it out, but in a constructive way, not

in a "gotcha" way … On Sept. 11, Peter's journalistic ability, coupled with his humanity,

 informed and helped comfort us. Like all those watching that day, he too was in pain over

 the destruction wreaked on his beloved city, but he soldiered on and did so with compassion

and eloquence. While that clear, calm voice is silent now, the memory of his articulate and

thoughtful presence will live on in our hearts forever.